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Baking with Chocolate event

From nine choices on a recent survey, the women at church selected this event as their first pick for upcoming activities for me to plan.  The concept of a once a month (or close to it) Relief Society activity hasn't really been grasped here, and past events have been sort of lumped in with other activities, like our baby quilt making project turned out to be.  As I felt the importance of my calling and striving to carry it out the way I believe the mid-week activities are intended, I expressed to the RS president that I hope that we can make this event be just for the women, where they can eagerly look forward to a special time of socializing with others and not have to worry about taking care of the kids and simply enjoy a night out together. 
In order to emphasize that this was planned for the women, after I heard that it had been announced in priesthood meeting and the men were excited about it, I knew my work was cut out for me.  Since then, I created these invitations that specify who the event is supposed to be planned for, and have made sure we have some men scheduled to help out for the children's class.  So far, that part sounds good, but at the last minute, I was told that all the young women were invited to attend too.  I feel bad that they don't have regular mutual activities, so I can see why the girls would want to join us--that and for the tasty chocolate.  It will be fine to have them there, but I do envision regular monthly Relief Society events that can help serve the purpose of the organization, which is not to be in the entertainment business.
As you can see, I made two versions of the invitation, about six copies in English and about thirty-four in Chinese, and I still ran out.  I asked my faithful translation guru, Abish, to help by putting the Chinese text following each line I had typed in English.  I just cut and pasted, hoping that everything came out fine. Apparently it worked, but I have no idea what any of the characters say. And since I don't have a clue about any of it, I couldn't exactly change font types.  I did manage to add bold and highlights and indents. 
I will be making three recipes, a gloriously delicious Texas sheet cake, pictured above, Triple Layer Brownies, and last but not least, No Bake Cookies, since most homes here don't have ovens, so after this, everyone will know how to whip up a batch of chocolate oatmeal peanut butter cookies without having to go to the church to borrow the oven.
I've been getting acquainted with this darling little girl, who lost her mom a few months ago, and every time I see her, I try to make sure she knows how delighted I am.  She is teaching me a little bit of Chinese while I teach her a little English.  I'll add more photos of her later.  Her nickname is Nini, and she came over to visit us on Sunday with a few others guests.  I took this picture of her on the very first day I met her.

Wish me luck for a busy weekend!  If you happen to see this invitation, and are a woman {smile}, you are welcome to join us on Saturday night at the LDS chapel in Jhubei at 7 pm.

Comments

Amanda said…
I love that you are making a difference in your ward. The invitations look great. I had never thought about the font issues that you mentioned, but it is totally true! I would have no idea what looks plain or fancy or weird. I hope your activity goes well. Good luck!
Heidi said…
Kelly I am so inspired by you right now! How blessed your ward is to have you in it, even for a short amount of time.
Kellie said…
Chocolate, yummy. I hope the event is an amazing success!!
Holly said…
Kelly, You. Are. Awesome! Those people in Taiwan are so lucky to have you there. You always amaze me. I think you're doing a wonderful thing for them by emphasizing the need and importance of regular RS gatherings (which will hopefully trickle down to the other groups as well). You are being a true pioneer and creating a better vision and future for your ward there.
Craignlisa said…
Kelly, when we moved into our new ward in Ohio, the bishopric challenged us to find a way to leave a legacy with this ward, if the time comes for us to leave. I truly believe that you have found a way to leave your legacy with your ward in Taiwan. I know that they believe that you are a true blessing in their lives. Even if it is something small like introducing chocolate. Yum.
Julie said…
Those invitations are so cute. I love the little clip on them. The sisters there are getting some Western crafty influence in you for sure. (I don't know if that sounded right. Read it twice if you need to.)
They don't have ovens? wow, that doesn't seem very easy for them. Will they like all that sweet stuff? Our Korean friends that we have had stay with us over the years never liked any of that stuff. Have fun and good luck with those fun activities.
~ Tina said…
that sheet cake looks delish!
NiNi is so cute!
Kelly said…
Julie, a few of the women I know here have little countertop ovens, but they're small, can't even fit a 9x13 pan in most of them.

Judging from fact that they picked baking with chocolate as their first choice of activities they were interested in, and the fact that the three pans of desserts I made during the event were devoured completely the moment I gave the go ahead, I would say, "YES! They like it!"
Kelly said…
Thanks, Tina! It's SOOO good too. And I agree, Ni Ni is adorable as can be. We just love her!

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