Skip to main content

Taiwan bakery tour

A friend of mine from church owns eight bakeries between Hsinchu and Taipei and invited me to tour the factory where they make everything. 
 Vivien is so nice to have given us a hands-on bakery tour.
This baker has worked for her for four years and has been trained in Japan on some specialty bread techniques.  This is Bori bread that is like crusty fresh loaf and soft inside.  He makes a quick cut with a blade held at an angle before putting into a hot stone oven (225 degrees Celsius) for 16 minutes.
 A favorite bread for me in Taiwan is this delicious cheese bread.
 I paid close attention and hope to be able to make my own version of cheese bread at home.
 After a sprinkle of black pepper and a row of high-melt cheese is added, it gets rolled up for the final rising.
 The bread is placed on canvas and handled gently before it goes into the oven.
 The scoring on this raisin and walnut bread was very artful with a sprinkling of flour before the cutting.
 Hot, fresh bread, right out of the oven smelled wonderful.
 Here's another friend of mine, whom I visit teach.
Her daughter, Lisa, just got home from her mission in Taiwan a couple of weeks ago is temporarily working at the bakery part-time.  She wasn't in a photo taking mood, which I can respect.
Neither was I!  But I smiled for the camera, make-up free, hair-net and all.  My friends and I enjoyed the day and Vivien gave each of us a loaf of Bori bread and a loaf of walnut raisin bread.  Vivien also gave me a kilo of her imported Japanese flour that is high-quality finely milled, and a bag of high-melt cheese to try out whipping up some bread soon.
It was a really fun outing and I snapped a few pictures of the rice paddy fields that show up in random spots, where ever possible.
Out of curiosity, I would like to have a lesson in rice growing so I can understand the process better.  I don't plan to grow any myself, but want to figure out how it grows and is harvested. I only know first hand what the fields looks like since they can be seen all over the place from where I've been so far in Taiwan.
In addition, I often see small patches of land nestled just about anywhere, of gardens where various produce is grown.  It's impressive how the Taiwanese have such a green thumb and are excellent at growing things.
Once I got home from the Elly Family bakery, I had worked up an appetite and was anxious to transform my Bori bread into something for lunch.
 I sliced it into thick slices and started cooking some bacon, imported from the United States through Costco.
Freshly baked bread with crispy bacon would be perfect for an American classic sandwich, the BLT, which is bacon, lettuce, and tomato on bread.
One thing I missed last fall was Miracle Whip, so I packed two plastic jars of it in my luggage and brought back to Taiwan.  Mayonnaise is readily available, but not this good stuff.  I like Miracle Whip on certain sandwiches, and mayo on other types.
Open faced BLTs for my lunch and for Christopher's after school snack were amazing with the soft and crusty bread.  They were a bit difficult to eat without another slice of bread on top, but it was a small loaf and I had plenty of toppings to spare.
There's a store in Hsinchu that sells one my favorite soft drinks, Diet A&W root beer, that went nicely with my meal.
It will be interesting to attempt scaling down the recipes that I got from Vivien's commercial-sized bakery to my household Kitchen Aid mixer.
 Their bakery had several huge mixers to get the job done.  She said this one costs about the same as a car!
This popular Taiwanese painting hangs in Vivien's office and is supposed to represent people rushing into your business and bring you good luck.
There are all kinds of things here that symbolize good luck, including this smiling old guy that was also in her factory.  Wish me luck as I try to make some cheese bread and Bori bread next week!  I'll be sure to post my results on my blog, unless it's a total flop, then I won't bother.
I'm grateful for the beautiful day and enjoyed the kindness of my friends, who helped to plant this cherry tree.
Check out the busy little bee in the center of the tree above.  Last year several of the women from church wanted to add some cheer to the grounds around the chapel, so they planted several cherry trees around the perimeter of the property to add beauty.  What a great idea!  Their act of service by planting those trees will be enjoyed by many in the future.
Vivien's kindness of sharing her bakery secrets with me will hopefully allow me to share what I have learned with family and friends for years to come as I bake with for them.  Thank you, Vivien, and Demi and Sis. Lin!

Comments

Kellie said…
Fun and yummy!!! When you master that bread, I want the recipe.
Julie said…
I love BLT's almost more than anything, and that is so great that you can have them there! what fun to tour a bakery there. You have really nice friends. I am glad they share their lives with you. I hope you have success making the cheese bread.
Bobbi said…
What fun to tour the bakery. With your cooking skills, I'll bet your bread turns out great. Good luck!
Dianne said…
That cheesy bread & BLT looks yummy, it all does! What neat friends you are making, thanks for sharing.
Casa de Mask said…
How fun!! I know this meant a great deal to you since you are such an amazing cook yourself. I must tell you how much I enjoy following your blog and reading about all the wonderful experiences you guys are having living out of the states. Much love to you, Kelly!!

Popular posts from this blog

Fun with Ninnies and Nini

Our family got to attend the monthly stake temple day at the Taipei temple on Saturday.   Lindsey and Christopher did their temple work, then waited outside on the beautiful grounds and at the chapel next door until we were finished with our session. After that, we enjoyed hamburgers at a place we heard about called California Grill, then did some exploring.
Lindsey arrived last week from Rexburg, completing 32 credit hours and her first year of college at Brigham Young University-Idaho. We are so glad to have her home with us!  She will be with us until she starts school again in September and will be taking two classes online in the meantime.  In addition to Lindsey's arrival, we've been blessed to have the company of 7-year-old Nini (her real name is Yeh Min-Yu) with us this week.  She's so darling and we love having her around too.  It's kind of funny that when Lindsey was a little toddler and she could not say her name well, she called herself Ninnies.  So we h…

Isaac's creation

One year ago today, this little angel came into our world, sent directly from heaven, without a doubt.  Isaac is our fourth child, but the first that I gave birth to.  He was the result of a successful fertility treatment called In Vitro Fertilization (IVF), our first and only attempt.  The fact that I was 48 years old when I got pregnant, is a miracle in and of itself.  I had long since given up the idea of ever being able to experience pregnancy and childbirth after having been diagnosed with unexplained infertility, until a rare contact from a dear friend had renewed my desire.  This is the story of how Isaac came to be, and the loving environment that welcomed him.  Take note of the numerous small miracles along the way, leading up to our pursuing this dream.

There was a three-week window of opportunity when our family had come to our Austin home for the holidays, while we were living in Taiwan for one year.  My long, lost friend sent us a beautiful Christmas card, perhaps the fi…

Flagstaff House Executive Chef Mark Monette's Family Legacy

Mark Monette, executive chef and partner of Flagstaff House, has been the man behind the scenes in the kitchen for countless special occasions and celebrations. This fine dining restaurant situated a few miles up Flagstaff Road in Boulder, perched at the Flatirons' edge with a bird's-eye view of the city, is where Monette has spent more than three decades fine-tuning his craft in this family run business. The restaurant and staff have received accolades and notoriety locally and nationally, including recognition for being named "Top Ten Restaurant in Boulder," "Most Romantic Restaurants in America" and "Best American Cuisine and Best Wine Selection." (This article is from a Q&A interview I did with him in February, 2017.)
Your father, Don Monette, bought the Flagstaff House in 1971 when you were 10 years old. What do you remember about the restaurant back in those days?
"We would come up here in the summer and work, and it was just busy al…